Posts for tag: root canal

By Anthony Gazzola, Jr., DMD
June 21, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  
DontFeartheRootCanal-itCouldSaveYourTooth

Many people consider a root canal treatment to be potentially an unpleasant experience. You might even feel a few butterflies fluttering in your stomach if we were to recommend one for you.

But there’s nothing actually to dread about this common and very effective treatment. The procedure doesn’t cause pain; in fact, it most likely relieves tooth pain. What’s more, it could save a tooth that would be otherwise lost.

The name comes from narrow passageways extending from the tip of the root to the innermost tooth pulp. The pulp contains nerves and other structures once vital to early tooth development. And although they’re not as important in a fully mature tooth, those nerves still function. In other words, they can still feel stimulation or pain.

That shouldn’t be a problem with a healthy tooth. But if tooth decay invades the inner pulp, those nerves now under attack will begin firing. You’ll know something’s wrong. As bad as it feels, though, the toothache isn’t your worst problem: if the decay isn’t stopped, it can spread through the root canals to the bone that could eventually lead to losing the tooth.

A root canal treatment removes the decayed pulp tissue and protects the tooth from re-infection. We first deaden the tooth and surrounding tissues with a local anesthesia and set up a rubber dam around the tooth to protect it from contamination from the surrounding environment. We then drill a small access hole through the enamel and dentin to reach the pulp chamber and root canals.

Using special instruments, we remove all the diseased tissue from the pulp and flush out the empty chamber and root canals with antibacterial solutions. After re-shaping the root canals, we fill them and the pulp chamber with gutta-percha, a rubber-like biocompatible material that conforms well to the root canal walls. We seal the gutta-percha with adhesive cement and then fill the access hole. Later, we’ll give the tooth further protection with a custom crown.

After the procedure, you may experience short-term minor discomfort usually manageable with over-the-counter pain relievers like ibuprofen. The good news, though, is that the excruciating nerve pain from within the tooth will be gone—and your tooth will have a new lease on life.

If you would like more information on saving a problem tooth with root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Canal Treatment: What You Need to Know.”

By Anthony Gazzola, Jr., DMD
July 15, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  
SeveralFactorsDetermineToothLongevityAfteraRootCanalTreatment

Tooth preservation is the ultimate aim of a root canal treatment. But how long should you expect a treated tooth to last? The answer will depend on a few different variables.

A root canal treatment is necessary when a tooth’s pulp — the inner tissue made of nerves, blood vessels and connective tissues — becomes infected with disease. As the pulp dies, the infection spreads into the adjacent bone; this can eventually lead to loss of the tooth.

To stop this process, we enter the tooth and remove all of the pulp, disinfect the pulp chamber and the root canals, and then fill the chamber and canals. Depending on the type of tooth and level of decay, we seal the tooth with a filling or install a crown to prevent re-infection. it’s then quite possible for a treated tooth to survive for years, decades, or even a lifetime.

There are a number of factors, though, that may affect its actual longevity. A primary one depends on how early in the disease you receive the root canal treatment. Tooth survival rates are much better if the infection hasn’t spread into the bone. The earlier you’re treated, the better the possible outcome.

Tooth survival also depends on how well and thorough the root canal is performed. It’s imperative to remove diseased tissue and disinfect the interior spaces, followed by filling and sealing. In a related matter, not all teeth are equal in form or function. Front teeth, used primarily for cutting and incurring less chewing force, typically have a single root and are much easier to treat than back teeth. Back teeth, by contrast, have multiple roots and so more root canals to access and treat. A front tooth may not require a crown, but a back tooth invariably will.

These factors, as well as aging (older teeth tend to be more brittle and more susceptible to fracture), all play a role in determining the treated tooth’s survival. But in spite of any negative factors, a root canal treatment is usually the best option for a diseased or damaged tooth. Although there are a number of good options for replacing a lost tooth, you're usually better in the long run if we can preserve your natural tooth for as long as possible.

If you would like more information on root canal treatments, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Canal Treatment: How Long Will it Last?

By Anthony Gazzola, Jr., DMD
March 03, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  
Top5ReasonsNottoDelayGettingaRootCanal

So you came in to the dental office for an exam, and now you’ve been told you need a root canal. But you’re wondering: Do I really have to do this? I’ve heard all sorts of things about the procedure. What if I wait a while — would that be so bad?

The answer is: It just might! Whenever we dentists recommend a root canal procedure, we have good reasons for doing so. Here are the top five reasons why you shouldn’t delay getting this important treatment.

  1. The tooth is infected and dying; a root canal stops the infection. While the outer layers of the tooth are hard, the inner pulp is made of soft, living tissue. This tissue sometimes becomes infected (through deep decay, cracks in the tooth surface, etc.), and begins to die. Once that happens, treatment is needed right away — to stop the pain, control the infection, and keep it from spreading.
  2. Root Canal Treatment Alleviates Pain. That’s right: Root canal treatment doesn’t cause pain — it relieves it. The procedure is relatively painless, despite the old stories you might have heard. In fact, it’s not unlike having a cavity treated, though it may take a little longer. So if you’re experiencing tooth pain (a major symptom in most cases of root canal trouble), remember that the sooner you get it treated, the sooner you’ll be pain-free.
  3. It won’t get better on its own… If you ignore some things, they will go away. Root canal problems aren’t one of those things. In some cases, if you wait long enough, the pain will go away. But that’s not a good sign, because the problem won’t go away on its own; it simply means that the nerves inside the tooth are all dead. The infection continues to smolder like glowing coals in a fire.
  4. …But it could get worse. Left untreated, bacteria from the infected tooth pulp can travel through the roots of the tooth and into the tissue of the gums and jaw. That can cause a painful, pus-filled abscess to form, which will require urgent treatment. In extreme cases, It can also result in increasing systemic (whole-body) inflammation, potentially putting you at risk for more serious conditions, like heart disease and stroke.
  5. Root Canal Treatment Can Save the Tooth. If you neglect treatment of a root canal problem long enough, you’re at serious risk for losing the infected tooth. And tooth loss, once it starts, can bring on a host of other problems — like an increased risk of tooth decay on remaining teeth, as well as gum disease, bite problems… and, as oral health problems escalate, even more tooth loss. Why put yourself at risk?

If you would like more information about root canal treatment, call our office for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “A Step-By-Step Guide To Root Canal Treatment” and “Tooth Pain? Don’t Wait!