Posts for: September, 2014

By Anthony Gazzola, Jr., DMD
September 23, 2014
Category: Oral Health
TVWellnessGuruJillianMichaelsDiscussesBreakingHerTwoFrontTeeth

As America's toughest trainer on the hit television program The Biggest Loser, Jillian Michaels helped people learn that they hold the power to change. And if anyone knows about the power of changing oneself, it is Jillian Michaels. In her recent interview with Dear Doctor magazine, Jillian discusses her childhood, the trauma of being overweight as a teenager (5' 2" and 175 pounds), and the day her life forever changed when she started martial arts training at a gym. “I started training when I was 17 and always loved it but never thought it would end up being my career,” she said.

Jillian also reveals that when she was a child, she broke her two front teeth and had them repaired with crowns. She added, “Now, I generally wear a mouthguard if I am doing anything where my teeth have any chance of being knocked out.”

When it comes to replacing teeth that are broken or damaged from trauma, or teeth that are damaged because of dental decay, grinding habits, or acid erosion, crowns may be your best option. And because the tooth enamel is damaged, a bit more of it must be removed before we can place a crown. Generally speaking, we must remove about 2 millimeters of tooth structure to place a crown. Once the crown is placed, the tooth will always require a crown, as this is an irreversible procedure. However, the good news is that a crown not only mimics the look and feel of a natural tooth, but it is also the optimal long-term solution. On average, a crown last between 5 and 15 years and requires no special maintenance. In fact, you should treat your crown as you do your natural teeth, with a daily cleaning regimen of brushing and flossing and routine dental examinations and cleanings.

To learn more about crowns or other cosmetic procedures, contact us today to schedule an appointment so that we can conduct a thorough examination, discuss any questions you have as well as what treatment options will be best for you. Or to learn more about crowns now, you can continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers.” And to read the entire interview with Jillian Michaels, please see the article “Jillian Michaels.”


By Anthony Gazzola, Jr., DMD
September 08, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: osteoporosis  
CertainDrugsTakenforOsteoporosisCouldAffectDentalCareOutcomes

If you have osteoporosis, one of the drugs you may be taking is alendronate, more commonly known by the brand name Fosamax®. Alendronate is a member of the bisphosphonate drug family, which inhibit bone resorption (the loss of bone mass). While an effective treatment of osteoporosis, alendronate may cause an opposite side effect in other areas of the body, the inhibition of new bone growth. This effect on the jaw in particular could result in an adverse reaction after dental surgery.

The main concern is a condition called osteonecrosis, or literally “bone death.” Bone tissue normally goes through a cycle of resorption (the dissolving of bone tissue) and new growth to replace the cells that have been lost through resorption. Osteonecrosis disrupts the growth phase so that the bone doesn’t recover properly after resorption. This results in the bone becoming weaker and less dense.

There have been a number of cases of increased osteonecrosis in patients on alendronate after experiencing trauma to the mouth. This includes dental surgery, particularly tooth extractions. In addition, patients with certain risk factors like diabetes, tobacco use or corticosteroid therapy appear more vulnerable to osteonecrosis.

Although the risk of osteonecrosis after dental surgery is small, many dentists recommend stopping the use of alendronate for three months before the procedure if you’ve been taking the drug for more than three years. This recommendation is based on a number of studies that seem to indicate three or more years of bisphosphonates therapy makes patients especially vulnerable to osteonecrosis. These studies also indicate stopping the therapy for three months significantly reduces the risk of developing the condition.

There’s still much to be learned about this link between alendronate therapy and dental health. It’s a good idea, then, to let us know what medications you’re taking (especially bisphosphonates) whenever you visit us for an exam. Knowing all your medications will help us develop the safest and most effective treatment plan for your dental care.

If you would like more information on bisphosphonates and their effect on oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Fosamax and Surgery.”